Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Today, I saw my jobs future..
#1
My job is (later edit WAS) somewhat mundane, repetitive even, and maybe my contribution is a taken with little thanks
when all said and done.  That said, it is a job that keeps me and my family secure and assured in the
land of milk and honey, that my home is in and where I live “my life”.
Today that may have changed, as a series of events have come together over the last few years,
(a series of events that I doubt is particular to me only, or of my making), into what will probably happen
to my job and very, very many similar jobs all over the length and breadth of
the lands of milk and honey we know and live in today.

I work for a subsidiary or sister company of a major global company with it’s main base in
Europe (head company 1 or HC 1). The factory I work in is considered by the major company to be
a sister company’s (sister company 1 or, SC 1) mainly a process adding value site to a
semi-finished product. This product (1) (there are several different named versions of this product) is
then sold to be made elsewhere into another product (2) of far higher value again.
In reality the factory does much more than one product (1) adding value process,
it also does other add value processes frequently required on the finished product (1), and
further also uses the finished product (1) to make and supply a far higher value product (2).

Approximately two years or so ago the factory I work in made a bid to get a new updated and
improved version of the semi-finished product (semi-finished product  6, or SP 6 as I’ll refer to it here).
This new SP 6 had obvious advantages over the older version SP 5 (semi-finished product 5)  that the
factory (Fac M.) I work in adds value to by the various processes it undertakes.
The new SP 6 was described as the future of the business. From a historical perspective this is reasonable
as  Fac M. has already progressed through several earlier SPs. Lighter, stronger, thinner, etc, etc with
each new SP. Fac M. was inspected and audited by the European HC 1, and customers of HC 1
and our own (that are HC 1 customers in reality).
Fac M. passed all with flying colours.
However a small “contract” for the new SP 6 was awarded to another factory of the HC 1 in
another nearby European country.

Fac M. was told everything was OK, there was only a small amount of SP 6 work and so
it had been moved to another plant within group (not the SC 1 group) to distribute work.

Fac M. continued work as normal, improving quality and productivity  along the way.
Requests for investment or updating of machinery seemed to fall on deaf ears however,
improve what you have, for as little as possible seemed the “way forward” we were told.

Fac M. got a new value adding process used on some of the product 1, this was installed, and
developed at Fac M. to well within HC 1 group standards.
In point of fact most of Fac M. had a return rate of about half a percent, most SC 1 and HC 1
in group suppliers to Fac M. had a return rate of between three quarters and one and a half percent.

Over the last 18 months little seems to have happened within the SC 1 group.
A major “merger” between two of SC 1 and HC 1 largest customers seems to have added to
the uncertainty and seeming “stagnation”. In these sorts of times there are always rumours aplenty.
Doom and gloom merchants thrive, every silence, every deed, every thing that happens can be
interpreted in both good and bad ways. In the end no one knows anything of significance,
except we do not know what is or is going to happen.

Recently some of the product 1 Fac M. adds value to have been moved to other HC 1 plants in Europe,
but other “new” versions of product 1 have been introduced to Fac M. All in all the overall amount of work
seems reasonably “steady” at Fac M., although declining slightly over the last year or so,
in line with the economic hardships we all face at present.

Several weeks ago we were requested to inspect another similar product 1 from a supplier in India.
This in itself was a surprise. The new supplier was apparently a plant that HC 1 group had recently acquired.
“Fortunately” the samples sent were lacking in some of the value added processes applied to the product..
However, the remedy would not be too difficult, and in all other respects the product 1 was very good.

Little more has been heard of this supplier to date, however today we inspected product 1 from
HC 1 product 1 Thailand…
Excellent product 1 it is too.

Fac M. and the industry / processes involved are not particularly labour intensive,
so I doubt labour costs are that bad, not particularly cheap I’ll grant, but not that bad either.
Machinery costs are quite expensive, but that is a relatively constant cost wherever the factory is located.
I fear this all comes down to energy costs. The machinery employed  does require and use a lot of energy.

If you were HC 1 where would you locate your factory, in the land of milk and honey,
or one of the lands of Kyoto exempt energy costs.

We also recently heard of a major competitor who has recently moved their value adding process to product 1
from our land of milk and honey to Czechoslovakia..

The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed
(and hence clamorous to be led to safety)
by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary.

H. L. Mencken.  

The hobgoblins have to be imaginary so that
"they" can offer their solutions, not THE solutions.
Reply
#2
The Law of Consequences. For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Bill Gates is talking about moving his opperation out of the country if the cost of power increases.
Reply
#3
29th July 2009.
Today at work we had an annoucement, we are entering a 30 day consultation period,
before being made redundent.
We got a "nice" letter explaining our jobs have gone to Thailand......

So, I have to find a job by mid September.
The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed
(and hence clamorous to be led to safety)
by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary.

H. L. Mencken.  

The hobgoblins have to be imaginary so that
"they" can offer their solutions, not THE solutions.
Reply
#4
Sad


It is our attitude toward free thought and free expression that will determine our fate. There must be no limit on the range of temperate discussion, no limits on thought. No subject must be taboo. No censor must preside at our assemblies.

–William O. Douglas, U.S. Supreme Court Justice, 1952
Reply
#5
"So, I have to find a job by mid September."

Run for Congress.  That may be the only way you will have Health Care in 2011.

In all seriousness, I wish you luck in your job search.  It's tough out there, but I have seen several friends find good jobs in this lousy economy.  It just takes a lot of patience and tolerance for rejection.
Reply
#6
Thank you George,
" It just takes a lot of patience and tolerance for rejection. "

I'm a climate sceptic............ ;D
The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed
(and hence clamorous to be led to safety)
by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary.

H. L. Mencken.  

The hobgoblins have to be imaginary so that
"they" can offer their solutions, not THE solutions.
Reply
#7
Hi All,
Firstly my apologies to SST for posting this as I have, but
sometimes I think something is so important it has to be done.
Please edit if you need to.

It seems my country is at the fore front, a world leader, and that explains what has happened to me
AND will happen to many, many more of my countrymen...
"We" may be down the pan (because of a Prime Minster and beaucracy we have never voted for..),
but I hope you all avoid the same fate, so please, read on.

http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/sto...83,00.html
Carbon captures UK imagination
Paul Kelly, Editor-at-large | August 05, 2009
Article from:  The Australian


BRITAIN is a case study in the urgency and agony of climate change politics.

Excerpt.
Gordon Brown and David Cameron, the leaders of its main parties, see climate change as the generational imperative, yet there is no guarantee their targets can be met.


At Westminster a revolution in governance is advanced. Leading departments have been allocated a legally binding carbon budget running parallel with financial budgets. Under Foreign Secretary David Miliband, British soft power and its foreign policy are being recast with a diplomatic strategy to market Britain across the world as a climate change leader. Prime Minister Brown argues the essence of being a successful society depends on de-carbonising the economy. The revolution is bipartisan: the Tories, heading for victory in next year's election, attack Labour for not doing enough more effectively and march behind their banner, "Vote blue, go green".

Rarely in the history of democracies has a new idea been embraced so passionately without any certainty its goals can be realised or what the consequences involve. With Britain legally pledged to cut emissions from 1990 levels by 80 per cent by 2050, one-third by 2020 and 22 per cent by 2012, such policies can be achieved only with a new political culture and immediate action.

British ministers work to promote this whole-of-government revolution. In Whitehall, many of the civil service advisers are young, enthusiasts and women. Behind the parties are tacticians who argue that climate change credentials are critical to carry the under-40 voters.
The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed
(and hence clamorous to be led to safety)
by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary.

H. L. Mencken.  

The hobgoblins have to be imaginary so that
"they" can offer their solutions, not THE solutions.
Reply
#8
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/sto...83,00.html

Continueing excerpt,
There are three big political messages from a week of briefings inside the British system. First, catastrophic Al Gore-type negative warnings, although still essential, must surrender to another narrative: that climate change is about positives and clean energy is an opportunity for new jobs and investment. For Britain, this polemic is essential to prevent the global financial crisis from ruining the momentum on climate change.

Energy and Climate Change Minister Ed Miliband -- the Foreign Secretary's brother -- recently said: "We think that the environmental industries in Britain can generate about an extra 400,000 jobs by 2015. What's happened in the past is that we have been good at generating some of the low-carbon energy but not so good at getting industry to locate here. People want to hear what is the post-recession economy going to look like and where are the jobs going to come from. We know the world is switching to low carbon and Britain needs to be at the forefront of that."

The British road map is laid out in last month's Low Carbon Transition Plan. By 2020, renewable electricity will rise to 30 per cent, with wind power pivotal to this target; nuclear is seen as vital, with government looking to new nuclear power stations; and the assumption is that Britain stays a fossil fuel nation. Britain's plans assume no alternative to fossil fuels in coming decades and this drives a huge campaign to make carbon capture and storage viable in technological and commercial terms. For Britain, its entire strategy hinges on bringing CCS to fruition.
The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed
(and hence clamorous to be led to safety)
by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary.

H. L. Mencken.  

The hobgoblins have to be imaginary so that
"they" can offer their solutions, not THE solutions.
Reply
#9
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/sto...83,00.html

Continueing excerpt,

Second, the road map is plagued by doubt, uncertainty and technologies not yet commercially applied. Pricing carbon via relying on the European emissions trading system is not sufficient. British policy says that the ETS alone "will not be enough to enable the rapid development and use of low-carbon technologies". This opens the door to far-reaching winner-picking, government interventions, subsidies and renewable energy targets. The policy calls for financial support for renewables worth pound stg. 30 billion between now and 2020. There is a huge drive within the Whitehall bureaucracy to identify and support such projects.

As the policy concedes, such targets are "very challenging". They mean a "more active and strategic role for government" by encouraging businesses to invest and "mobilising individuals and communities across the country". Britain is completely unapologetic in its constant argument that "market forces on their own" cannot do the job. The carbon price won't be high enough to force the new investment needed.

But it will be a hit-and-miss affair. A Danish company has just closed its wind turbine manufacturing operation on the Isle of Wight. In response, Ed Miliband admitted there were planning problems and that "people have significant concerns about wind turbines being put up in different areas".

Meanwhile, ScottishPower at its Longannet power station on the Firth of Forth is testing a small prototype unit that captures carbon for the first time in any British coal-fired station, the aim being full application by 2014.

The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed
(and hence clamorous to be led to safety)
by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary.

H. L. Mencken.  

The hobgoblins have to be imaginary so that
"they" can offer their solutions, not THE solutions.
Reply
#10
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/sto...83,00.html

Continueing excerpt,

The problem is not technology but cost. So, huge government financial support for CCS is unavoidable. The British intent is to kick-start a new CCS industry. Frankly, it has no choice, as Britain's emission targets cannot be reached without CCS as onesolution.

There remains, however, a reluctance to confront the economic downside of this overall structural transformation of Britain's economy. How many jobs will be lost? Who will bear the higher energy costs? When these questions were pressed in Whitehall, there was always one resort: the Stern bible. Indeed, it is tempting to think the embrace of Nicholas Stern's report is the greatest intellectual movement in Whitehall since the embrace of John Maynard Keynes last century. Stern is the constant reference point: the message is that a low-cost, high-carbon option does not exist and Stern has shown "that the costs of action will be far less than the costs of inaction". It would be nice to think the politics will end here, but that would be a false conclusion.

Third, Brown in his recent "Road map to Copenhagen" speech spelled out one essential condition for a global compact: a decision by the rich nations to help finance emission reductions by the developing nations. Brown proposed a $US100bn ($119bn) global fund (bribe is more accurate) in an effort to bring the big emitters from the developing world into the tent. Sounds good, you think?
The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed
(and hence clamorous to be led to safety)
by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary.

H. L. Mencken.  

The hobgoblins have to be imaginary so that
"they" can offer their solutions, not THE solutions.
Reply
#11
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/sto...83,00.html

Continueing excerpt,
Just consider the politics. The big developing emitter is China, a net creditor power with the largest foreign currency reserves in world history. It invests these reserves in the US, funding America's current account deficit. The idea of the rich nations (led by the big debtor power the US) generously financing China's emission cuts despite China's huge surplus will sound to the man in the street like an act of madness.

In Whitehall, private views about Copenhagen recall those of Kevin Rudd: it is difficult to discern how a meaningful, comprehensive agreement can be reached. A visitor leaves Whitehall seeing no need to change his perception that China's national interest means that it will not meet the size and type of emission action demanded by the developed nations. As for India, forget it.

There is, however, no gainsaying that a revolution has occurred in Britain with climate change policy entrenched in its laws, civil administration, political culture and foreign policy.
The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed
(and hence clamorous to be led to safety)
by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary.

H. L. Mencken.  

The hobgoblins have to be imaginary so that
"they" can offer their solutions, not THE solutions.
Reply
#12
Oh darn, history it seems is about to repeat itself. Another mundane (but quite well paid) job appears to be about to bite the dust..
Angry
The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed
(and hence clamorous to be led to safety)
by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary.

H. L. Mencken.  

The hobgoblins have to be imaginary so that
"they" can offer their solutions, not THE solutions.
Reply
#13
(05-05-2017, 03:31 AM)Derek Wrote: Oh darn, history it seems is about to repeat itself. Another mundane (but quite well paid) job appears to be about to bite the dust..
Angry

Ouch!

Hope you set some back for a time, till you get a new one.

Me no longer work anymore, as I am on Disability pay.
It is our attitude toward free thought and free expression that will determine our fate. There must be no limit on the range of temperate discussion, no limits on thought. No subject must be taboo. No censor must preside at our assemblies.

–William O. Douglas, U.S. Supreme Court Justice, 1952
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Weather today Sunsettommy 1 3,603 07-04-2011, 05:11 PM
Last Post: Scpg02.
  Today is 10-10-10 Questioning_Climate 5 6,358 10-10-2010, 01:20 PM
Last Post: Sunsettommy



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)